One Woman’s Journey

My journey to Humanism

| |

Betty Nassaka is the founder president of the Ugandan Humanist Effort to Save Women (UHESWO) which is affiliated to IHEU member organization UHASSO. In this personal account she writes about how she developed a critical and independent mind in a country where religion and tradition dominate and rarely give women the opportunity to grow.

What my Parents Taught Me

I grew up in a family that worships both God and gods. My father was killed in the war of liberation; my stepfather, who was a traditional healer, went to church with my mother on Sundays.

After noticing that most of my stepfather’s clients were victims of AIDS, I asked him one day why most of his clients would eventually die? He responded by asking me if he was God to be able to save their lives. On another occasion I questioned my mother on why she was going to church, and yet prayed to other gods too? She responded by asking if anyone was forcing me to go to church or to a shrine.

My parents were insensitive to my need to know and to understand. Whenever I asked them a question, I was
rewarded by another question. So, I stopped asking them and, instead, started on the path of thinking for myself and looking for logical answers to the questions I had.

Continue reading “One Woman’s Journey”

Study finds that females outnumber males, online in U.S

Last Updated: Friday, April 13, 2007 | 10:27 AM ET
CBC News

Bucking the perception of the internet as a male-dominated world, a study released this week found more women than men are going online in the United States.

An estimated 97.2 million females aged 3 and older will be online in 2007, or 51.7 per cent of the total online population in the U.S., according to a report by eMarketer.

The report, Women Online: Taking a New Look, suggests female internet usage has been ahead of male usage for some time. But now, eMarketer said, other researchers such as comScore Media Matrix, Arbitron and
Edison Media Research support the same conclusion.

According to eMarketer, female usage of the internet in the U.S. has risen 12.4 per cent since 2000, compared with 3.2 percent for males.  In 2011, 109.7 million U.S. females are projected to be online, amounting to 51.9 percent of the online population.

However, women don’t appear to be as enamored of online video as their male counterparts, the study found. Only 66 percent of the estimated 97.2 million females online watch videos, compared with 78 percent of the 90.9 million men.

The author of the eMarketer report said the change in demographics could affect trends in content and usage of the web. ” For girls who have grown up with technology, there is no significant gender gap in internet usage,” said eMarketer senior analyst Debra Aho Williamson. ” The rise of activities that are particularly appealing to young females, such as social networking, will result in even greater usage.”

Studies that look at only adult populations still find more men online than women in the U.S.

The Pew Internet & American Life Project from April 2006 reported 74 percent of adult males in the U.S. were online, compared with 71 percent of women.

A Statistics Canada study of adults conducted in 2005 found a minuscule difference in usage between the sexes, with 68 percent of men versus 67.8 percent of women counting as internet users.

All of us like to be proven RIGHT

My 2$
Er, not exactly.  Many warm, dry, well fed and well loved humans enjoy the exploration of ideas. If one answer inevitably leads to another question, and therefore more exploration, then all is good. Daily exploration practice builds the process of relationships without bringing negativity into the circle.

Evidence of pain … it’s very subjective, sometimes all the positive energy on the planet isn’t enough to stop the tears.  My subjective observation of our community sees a tad lack of positive energy on several levels.  Healing in this environment isn’t going to be easy.

OMG! It’s a negative thought and then our ego takes it personally, and *then* … we want to be right and some begin to gather the troops….

Generally, men seem to not take exploration of “it’s only an idea” so personally. imho, (in my humble observation) our community tends to practice some kind of strange communication about ideas, about exploration. It may be some way of isolating any diversity?  We don’t tolerate it well?  What’s up with that?

Could needing to be right, a psuedo-comfort, be an analogy to sticking your head in the mud?

Blog On!

Turing Award – First Woman Wins

A 40 year male tradition is broken!
A. M. Turing Award
– !

Frances Allen
Frances Allen

Frances Elizabeth “Fran” Allen (born 1932) is an American computer scientist and pioneer in the field of optimizing compilers. Her achievements include seminal work in compilers, code optimizati

on, and parallelization. She was the first female IBM Fellow and first female Turing Award winner.
— Wikipedia

ACM’s most prestigious technical award is accompanied by a prize of $100,000. It is given to an individual selected for contributions of a technical nature made to the computing community. The contributions should be of lasting and major technical importance to the computer field. Financial support of the Turing Award is provided by the Intel Corporation.

Just Say No by Nancy

Re: “go home and bake cookies”  or 
“don’t worry your pretty little head”

So what would be a ‘male’ version of “go bake cookies”? “Go home and mow the lawn or take out the garbage?” Just doesn’t have the same bite to it, probably because a lot of women also do these things.

It doesn’t have the same bite because it doesn’t have the same kind of subtext.  Telling a woman to go home and bake cookies has nothing to do with cookies.  I don’t care how good your cookies are, it’s an insult to say this. He’s telling her to leave the man work to him, that she should leave and return to the home and kitchen where women belong.  He’s telling her that she has no place there. …

This is such a much larger topic, and whenever someone posts something along these lines, we all jump on it, I think, because we’re all affected by it.  The pretty little head and go home and bake statements are the hardest part of my job.  They happen. Or what about the topic that came up about a month ago about the company that had invitation-only golf days, and only the men were invited?  There are so many things like this.

In one place I worked, there were 10 guys in a group of 12.  Us girls were expected to hang together while the guys went off in their own groups. On one hand, there was no reason for me to expect to be invited to go to lunch and hang out with this group of 20-something white boys, but because they did hang together and talk shop when they were at lunch and whatnot, they were all pretty much on the same page about work stuff and we two women were not.  There was simply no way in.

So, I switched jobs. I’ve switched jobs three times in the last seven years, and I run into it everywhere.  The women don’t get promoted. There are guys at every company who are arrogant and exclusive.

I think the solution is two-pronged.  Increase our ranks whenever we can. Encourage girls to get into technology fields so that we’re not so outnumbered.  And second, have zero tolerance for the arrogant, exclusive behavior we are the targets of. Zero tolerance.

-Nancy